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May, 2019:

Setting up a secure Postfix server in 2019 - what to consider?

Postfix is great, and widely used, but freshly installed it's like a newborn child. Nowadays there's a lot of work required to get it to an acceptable level to face the wild west of the Internet.

NB: This is a living document and will probably change over time as I revise my own methods for managing my servers.

Running an MTA to an 'acceptable' standard now requires lots of additional config and tuning, but it's satisfying once done. Be prepared to learn lots about DNS, TLS, certificate structure, mail filtering (miltering), regular expression and monitoring - crucial once your system is operational.

Once you've had your fill of the RFCs (https://www.fastmail.com/help/technical/standards.html), there's plenty other stuff to learn. http://www.emailarchivestaskforce.org/documents/guide-to-email-standards/ is worth a read, and are you sure you know how to validate an email address? https://haacked.com/archive/2007/08/21/i-knew-how-to-validate-an-email-address-until-i.aspx/

For newcomers, important areas to cover are:

  • understanding quirks of different email clients, some of the odd scenarios with specific email services
  • familiarising oneself with the certificate process
  • how TLS is employed with email
  • Hands-on experience is crucial!
  • Doing dry runs with a dev system is invaluable - you must be able to make and break things without taking down customers' email πŸ™‚

I administer shared Postfix servers for numerous clients. Some are newest releases of Postfix, and some, due to legacy requirements, are older. Nothing necessarily wrong with that, but some configuration options aren't always available.

If I was setting up a new Postfix server today, I'd go through these steps:

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Frameserving from Premiere Pro CC 2019 to FFmpeg - yes we can!

A while ago while working on batches of video edits, I came to the realisation that frameserving is simply the best, most flexible way to encode. But time marches on, and so did my software - eventually I came to a new machine, new Premiere Pro and - catastrophe - no apparent support for frameserving.

Vouk's excellent Voukoder plugin for After Effects and Premiere is coming along - with FFmpeg/libav filters to be included in an imminent future release - but for the time being to do more complicated things requires frameserving. It's also a worthwhile skill to have.

Cleverer people than me have solved the CC2019 conundrum - for those of you editing in Premiere it's once again fairly easy to frameserve encode. However, it did take a bit of sleuthing to figure out a few things; this tutorial should help you to avoid the same problems I encountered.

Spoiler: it's a little work, not too much though, and the results are great
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